10,000 KM, directed by Carlos Marqués-Marcet, written by Carlos Marqués-Marcet and Clara Roquet

The AFI Film Festival always brings a breeze of fresh air to the movie landscape in Los Angeles. Among the many outstanding films at the festival, I loved Carlos Marqués-Marcet’s opera prima 10,000 KM (Long Distance). With a special award for its acting duo at SXSW and swiping the top prizes at the Malaga Film Festival in Spain, this moving film will be one of the most remembered indies of 2014 and a strong candidate for the Spanish Academy Awards.

10,000 KM is not another love story. It is a love story for the age of globalization and social media dependence. Alex and Sergio live happy in Barcelona. He is a teacher; she is an artist. They are in love and planning to have a baby. Life is simple. Life is good. Until she receives an unexpected artistic residence in Los Angeles. Can their relationship survive a year 10,000 km apart?

Carlos Marqués-Marcet takes us on this emotional journey with a pulse we rarely see in first-time directors. And that is clear from the first frame of the film to the last. The movie opens with a 20-minute long take –a continuous shot that captures the action without cutting- and usually the stamp a director wants to be remembered by. From the famous opening of Orson Wells’ Touch of Evil to the ones in Robert Altman’s The Player, Spielberg’s War of the Worlds, and Alfoso Cuarón’s Children of Men and Gravity, long takes are shots meant for critics to discuss and point out. But why are long takes so interesting? Well, usually because of its technical complexity and beautiful choreography. But sometimes, something else lies underneath these virtuoso shots.

Let’s take, for example, one of my all time favorites: Scorsese’s Goodfellas. In it Ray Liotta introduces Lorraine Bracco to his world at the Copacabana. The reason I love that shot so much is because of how well it works in the context of that particular story. Henry (Liotta) seduces Karen (Bracco) by showing off his connections, his wealth and his power through a beautifully designed choreography that takes us from outside of the club to a front table inside, going through the back entrance and labyrinth kitchen. At the same time Scorsese seduces his audience with an “oh my God, look how good I am at this” kind of shot. It’s the perfect symbiosis of form and content.

In 10,000 KM, Marqués-Marcet does something similar. The happy, solid couple is introduced to us with a solid one shot that takes us from them making love in bed, to brushing their teeth, to eating breakfast. As if we were watching a play, the complicity between the incredible performers Natalia Tena and David Verdaguer, unfolds organically and in real time in front of our eyes. Again, form and content together.

After that, the film will take a u-turn. The rest of the scenes will be very fragmented, like Alex and Sergio’s relationship. Through text messages, e-mails, Facebook updates, Google Maps and, especially through Skype calls, we follow the conversations of the couple as distance, like water penetrating rock, slowly erodes their relationship. And when we get to the final (and strongest) shot of the film, we are led to turn our eyes inward, to our own experiences to ask ourselves about the decisions we’ve made in our relationships, because distance is not only a spatial measurement.

Besides the mentioned aesthetic qualities of the film, its greatest asset is the touching performance by both of its protagonist. What could have been a claustrophobic and even boring film becomes a beautiful, intense and bittersweet portrait of love in the digital era. Produced by Lastor Media and LA-based LA Panda Productions, 10,000 KM will hit the theaters January from Broad Green Pictures.

View the trailer for 10,000 KM here: https://vimeo.com/88695931

Review written by Andres Rosende

Andres Rosende is an LA based writer and director. He holds an MFA in screenwriting and directing from Columbia University. His films have played at festivals around the globe including Cannes, Sitges, Cleveland and South by Southwest, winning more than 40 international awards.

Posted in Film Reviews, etc.

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