The Wound and The Gift, directed by Linda Hoaglund

Last weekend saw the 5th annual DOC NYC film festival in Manhattan fill the IFC Center, Chelsea Bow Tie Cinemas and the SVA Theater with more than 130 films and events. Among the unusual highlights was Linda Hoaglund’s beautifully-crafted The Wound and The Gift. Focusing on a handful of sanctuaries for animals that have been abused, neglected, are in danger of being put down or facing extinction, this 80-minute documentary makes a subtle case for animals giving back to their caregivers as much as they receive. Stunningly lensed by cinematographer Kirsten Johnson, the film provides brief portraits of several natural reserves dedicated to animals ranging from wolfdogs (wolves bred with dogs) to circus animals referred to as “surplus” by their owners to white cranes in Japan that stand five feet tall and were facing extinction before being saved by villagers, themselves struggling for their existence. Ending with the cranes in Japan was a nice touch by Hoaglund as throughout the film she weaves an animated Japanese fairy tale narrated by Vanessa Redgrave about a wounded crane being saved by a poor peasant and attempting to give back to the peasant, hence the film’s title.

Although the fable and its accompanying vivid animation from illustrator Victo Ngai (http://victo-ngai.com/) adds an enjoyable element of fantasy and folklore, it’s the moments between the animals and the humans in the very real world that are most memorable and often powerful, though to Hoaglund’s credit she never hits the viewer over the head with pronouncements. But she certainly leads them to inevitable conclusions, surely including the realization that any individual who would breed dogs with wolves in a selfish attempt to create a “wild” domestic pet (that will become unmanageable once it reaches maturity) is not only foolish but harmful to the balance between humans and animals. What happens to these innocent creatures when they show their natural inclination for independence? They are generally shot, disposed of like some misguided minor experiment. Such manipulation of animals is in direct contrast to the trust and reciprocal nature of the relationship that can exist between humans and animals, whether it’s dogs or cats in the comfort of our homes or an adult tiger or lion saved from an abusive circus owner.

Perhaps the most arresting segment in the film focuses on a ranch for old race horses where prison inmates with an aptitude for it are given the opportunity to learn about caring for the horses, potentially gaining a skill they can use to find employment upon release. More to the point, working with the horses allows them to regain a sense of purpose and a place in the world outside the prison walls. Just as the inmates may otherwise be treated as expendable, the animals have a place on this planet and an awareness of themselves, though their communication comes in a language people must work to comprehend. Ultimately, The Wound and The Gift serves as a reminder that we are not the only inhabitants of this planet but as the dominant species we owe something to the other occupants, if only in hopes of living on a more compassionate plane of existence.

Visit the film’s website and watch the trailer: http://www.thewoundandthegift.com/

Learn about DOC NYC: http://www.docnyc.net/

Review written by Mike Fishman

Mike Fishman has an M.A. in Film from American University, has worked for ICM, IFP, Tribeca Film Institute, Hamptons International Film Festival and the Columbia University Film Program, and developed the website, IndependentFilmNow.

Posted in Film Reviews, etc.

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