The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1, directed by Francis Lawrence, screenplay by Peter Craig and Danny Strong

Review written By Andrés Rosende

I’ve always been a fan of The Hunger Games. In this age of superhero franchises and young adult fantasy movies, Katniss Everdeen stands out as a feminist heroine who challenges traditional narratives about women: she carries a bow, kills and survives, is not emotionally available and prefers to act instead of speaking. She hunts while her male counterpart bakes, speaks about feelings, and encourages her to open up and share. And while her biggest competitor in the franchise war, Bella Swan from Twilight is a clumsy, helpless girl willing to sacrifice everything – her family, her friends and her life – to be with her vampire love, Katniss sacrifices herself to save her sister and eventually becomes the leader of the rebellion against the totalitarianism of the Capitol. At the end of Twilight, Bella is pregnant, married and refuses to go to college, opting to have a baby that might kill her. The message is clear: abstinence leads to marriage and motherhood to the apotheosis of a woman’s life. Katniss, on the other hand, is a refreshing girl. She is strong, smart; doesn’t follow the rules and proves she doesn’t need Prince Charming to protect her. In short, Katniss is a good role model for teenagers.

All that said, Mockingjay Part 1, one of the most anticipated films of the year, is not a good movie. It’s actually a clear example of commercial interests being put ahead of storytelling. Unfortunately, this is becoming more and more common in Hollywood these days. And it’s too bad because it could have been a great finale for a very entertaining and interesting franchise.

Dividing the final book into two movies makes no narrative sense but follows what the Harry Potter and Twilight sagas did (not to mention what Peter Jackson did with The Hobbit). And it is a strategy that works in the box office. Mockingjay Part 1 made more than $121 million on its first weekend and it’s getting close to $600 million worldwide. The problem with the film is that it feels like a huge set-up, full of exposition, for something we have to wait a year to see. To put it plainly: nothing happens in this film.

Lets imagine for a second that you are reading Little Red Riding Hood to a kid but instead of telling the full story you stop when Little Red Riding Hood meets the Wolf. Still you have to tell the story in the same amount of time. What would happen? Well, you would maybe describe a day in Little Red’s life: school, friends, games, homework, etc. We would go into depth about her relationship with her mum and her grandmother. We would make clear how far her grandmother’s house is from theirs; maybe she will study a big map of the forest…Then, her journey begins: she would have to stop to smell the flowers, listen to the birds and talk to the neighbors. She would probably have to take a couple of detours to meet some colorful creatures until she would finally encounter the Wolf. And now that the story starts to get exciting, we tell the kid to go to bed and that tomorrow we’ll finish the story, promising the ending is amazing. That’s exactly how I felt watching Mockingjay Part 1.

The film starts a few days after the close of Catching Fire with a tormented Katniss Everdeen living in an underground bunker, which is all that’s left from District 13, the military base of the rebellion against the Capitol dictatorship. Its leaders want to use her popularity to create a propaganda campaign. However, Katniss only wants to get back Peeta Mellark, her sidekick/love-interest. She agrees to become the “Mockingjay,” the symbol of hope and resistance for the propaganda campaign, but she is a terrible actress and the ads have no soul…until she sees with her own eyes the cruelty of the Capitol. And then, for a second, we get to see what Katniss will become in the final chapter of the saga. Unfortunately, this and a few other interesting moments are not reason enough for this film to exist. The movie becomes a drag and should have been the first act, the first 30 minutes, of a full film.

Francis Lawrence has a good feel for portraying the post apocalyptical world of Hunger Games but there is nothing a director can do without a screenplay. The most interesting – I should probably say the only interesting – thing about Mockingjay Part 1 is its political satire in the era of mass media manipulation that resonates so well in our present world. But it’s the amazing performers that are the main reason the film is watchable. Jennifer Lawrence is one of those people I can watch breathe and find interesting, but she delivers one of her weakest performances. For most of the movie she just stares in anger and despair. Donald Sutherland, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Stanley Tucci Natalie Dormer, Julianne Moore and the unique Philip Seymour Hoffman (cinema is really going to miss you) raise the film from mediocrity, although it has the feel of a director who was given a bunch of Ferraris and just a suburban street with a lot of speed bumps to drive in.

Mockingjay Part 1 ends with a great plot twist (meeting the Wolf) and promises us an epic conclusion full of action and fireworks where, maybe, Katniss will get a full character arc and become the feminist leader of this revolution. We’ll know in 12 months.

Andrés Rosende is an LA based writer and director. He holds an MFA in screenwriting and directing from Columbia University. His films have played at festivals around the globe including Cannes, Sitges, Cleveland and South by Southwest, winning more than 40 international awards.

Posted in Film Reviews, etc.

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