Fifty Shades of Grey, directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson, written by Kelly Marcel

Review written by Andrés Rosende

The sky is filled with dark clouds. A storm is coming. Or at least, that’s what we are promised. That is, in fact, the reason we are watching this film after all. That, and a good marketing and publicity campaign.

Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson) is a literature student filling in for her sick friend en route to interview billionaire Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan). She is cute, insecure and a little clumsy. He is sophisticated, mysterious, attractive… and filthy rich. Love a first sight? The lack of chemistry between Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan is so evident, that it’s difficult to get past this premise. But in any case, could a premise be more stereotypical?

She comes out of the building, suffocating, the rain cooling her down. Unfortunately, the promise of arousal doesn’t ever get fulfilled and the only word that comes to mind after watching these particular people naked in elaborate sex scenes for two hours is boredom. The film seems like a housewife fantasy of forbidden love and female “empowerment” (of course by being saved by a wealthy prince charming and being submissive to him). Is this Twilight all over again? Do we really need to make more movies about women discovering their own pleasure by serving men?

Mr. Grey stalks Anastasia, buys her first editions of her favorite novels, a laptop, and even a car. He flies her around in his helicopter and takes her to his amazing (and soulless) apartment. Old fashion seduction? Next thing we know, Christian wants Anastasia to sign a contract to become his submissive. Now we learn she is a virgin. They have sex and sleep together…. and an incredible discovery occurs to Ana. She likes sex! Eventually we get to the playroom where he keeps all his sex toys.

This is supposed to be the climax of the film, the hottest sex scene, with whips and chains and the whole shebang… but it looks a lot like a 70s soft porn TV film. Eroticism? It would seem director Sam Taylor-Johnson has no clue what that is. And neither of our protagonists look very much into it. Nevertheless, they look happy. Until that night, where she isn’t happy anymore. She wants to understand why (let’s keep in mind that her main conflict in the film is getting the powerful man to cuddle with her after sex!).

The answer comes as if from a third grade psychology book (he was poor as a child and abused as a teen). Anastasia comes to the conclusion that the only way to understand him is by being punished (really? Why?). And then, the movie ends. She has grown up. She is a woman, strong, independent. She doesn’t need him anymore.

I’m not sure if the intention of this relationship was for each character to help each other grow – Christian becoming more in touch with his feelings; Anastasia more open to new experiences – but the reality is, when that elevator door closes at the end, we don’t care. There is nothing profound here; just a bunch of sexist stereotypes about gender roles and paper-thin characters. Jamie Dornan hardly seems to do, or need to do, anything to inhabit his “character.” Because the only thing he needs to become Christian Grey is to be hot, rich, and a good lover. And that is all he is. Why would anyone fall in love with him? Dakota Johnson does a much better job trying to give life to a ridiculous cardboard character. Her performance, one funny scene (when they discuss the terms of the sex contract) and a few good songs are the only redeeming qualities of Fifty Shades of Grey.

Andrés Rosende is an LA based writer and director. He holds an MFA in screenwriting and directing from Columbia University. His films have played at festivals around the globe including Cannes, Sitges, Cleveland and South by Southwest, winning more than 40 international awards.

Posted in Film Reviews, etc.

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